About your Search

20121226
20130103
STATION
KQED (PBS) 7
KRCB (PBS) 4
WHUT (Howard University Television) 4
CNNW 3
CSPAN 3
CSPAN2 3
WBAL (NBC) 3
WRC (NBC) 3
KQEH (PBS) 2
WETA 2
FBC 1
MSNBCW 1
LANGUAGE
English 37
Search Results 0 to 36 of about 37 (some duplicates have been removed)
about america's energy, economy and environment. i'm greg dalton. in 1988, nasa scientist james hansen told a congressional hearing that it was 99% certain that burning fossil fuels was heating the earth's atmosphere. the next day, a new york times headline proclaimed, quote, global warming has begun, expert tells senate. a quarter century later, dr. hansen and other scientists are still striving to convince much of the united states that basic scientific observation -- seas are rising, glaciers are disappearing, floods are increasing. humans are the cause. about half of americans now accept that fact, 40% do not, according to gallup. over the next hour, we will discuss climate science communication, public policy and opinion, with james hansen and our live audience here at the commonwealth club of california in san francisco. today, dr. hansen is receiving the 2012 stephen schneider award for outstanding climate science communication bestowed by climate one. stephen schneider was a pioneering scientist at stanford who was involved in the formation of climate one that which is a sustai
about wind energy that needs to be sunsetted, soon. you bring up the side of the cliff that no one talks about. the sequester, the automatic spending reduction, i don't think it would be a bad thing if washington took the sequester and showed that they could cut spending. >> because we have a never budget balancing act going on with the journalist pointed out the secret gang of six meetings, that's budgeting by, secret gang of 12 meetings. and-- >> quickly that's what we use today call blue smoke and mirrors in washington and that's why people are upset at washington. don't trust them. david: good to see you. well, the numbers are in and you were not shopping as much as last year, apparently. holiday retail sales were basically unchanged from last year and sandy, of course, and the connecticut shooting got some blame, but what about no jobs and no money? coming up, the opening bell, futures are up. [ indistinct shouting ] ♪ [ indistinct shouting ] [ male announcer ] time and sales data. split-second stats. [ indistinct shouting ] ♪ it's so close to the options floor... [ indistinct s
as to develop the unconventional fossil fuels because they're dirtier, you get less energy per unit carbon and you get all these other pollution, regional pollution. so we need to try to talk common sense into them and we've -- you know, we've done -- i've been arrested in the front of the white house because of the tar sands. and there are more and more people who are willing to stand up and protest against those. and i know i sound like a broken record, but just -- and i've realized that just trying to block an individual carbon source, although that's meritorious, it won't work if we don't have a price on carbon. >> yeah. and china will just -- all right. we're gonna invite your participation and, particularly, if you haven't had a chance to ask a question. and i'm gonna be assertive about -- i'm encouraging you to be brief and get to your question so we can get as many people to participate as possible. the line starts with our producer jane ann right there, and then i welcome your comments for dr. hansen. let's invite the audience participation. yes, welcome to climate one. >> thank y
. choose your energy. [ clicking ] [ grunting ] [ breathing heavily ] an energizing fruit or relaxing mint flavor. 5 rpm gum. stimulate your senses. 5 rpm gum. i played a round of golf.id in the last five hours? then i read a book while teachingyself how to play guitar; ran ten miles while knitting myself a sweater; jumped out of a plane. finally, i became a ping pong master while recording my debut album. how you ask? with 5-hour energy. i get hours of energy now -- no crash later. wait to see the next five hours. [ sniffs ] i took dayquil but my nose is still runny. [ male announcer ] truth is, dayquil doesn't treat that. really? [ male announcer ] alka-seltzer plus fights your worst cold symptoms, plus it relieves your runny nose. [ breathes deeply ] awesome. [ male announcer ] yes, it is. that's the cold truth! [ male announcer ] yes, it is. excuse me, sir i'm gonna have to ask you to power down your little word game. i think your friends will understand. oh no, it's actually my geico app...see? ...i just uh paid my bill. did you really? from the plane? yeah, i can manage my policy, ge
of a glorious past. and some parts of the city bustle with holiday energy. but not far away: closed-up storefronts. and, further below the surface, this: a health clinic set up by the greek branch of the international aid group, doctors of the world to serve the country's newly poor. dr. nikitis kanakis is its director. >> brown: kanakis group, in fact, had to cut back some of its work in africa because of the needs at home. here in perama, unemployment tops 50% as the shrinking economy has crippled much of the local shipping industry. at the same time, the deeply indebted greek government has made dramatic budget cuts, including to health benefits. the combination has left many here without access to private or public care. and that's meant a stunning rise in disease and mortality rates. >> brown: economists, of course, speak of a different kind of necessary medicine: the kind a deeply indebted nation must take. the price for living and consuming well beyond its means for far too long. >> the medicine is necessary. it was, though, delivered very abruptly. >> brown: as a government
or the force of your energy? >> well, energy without which there is nothing. so i was genetically very sound. i come from an energetic family. i came from a family that refused ever to to accept a fee. my grandfather was blind at the age of ten. he wanted to go to the senate, which was an important place in those days. and he got there at the age of 38 being able to read. >> rose: and you would read to him? >> i read to him as a kid, i was brought up in his house. and i never, ever felt sorry for myself because i would think of him. i had two eyes, at least. so i had these examples in front of me of people who had overcome quite a lot. so i was -- that combined with energy. >> rose: what would you do different in the life that you have lived? >> i can't think of anything. i have done pretty much what i wanted to do. i'll give a little of advice out there for those who worry about their place in the world. always remember that it is of no consequence to you what people think of you. it's what you think of them. that's how you live your life.m >> you sometimes have tears of rapture, sometimes te
can sell any remaining stocks in stores. congress decided to stop using them for more energy efficient ones. >> 90% of energy that the bulb generates is wasted. so what they replace them with are more energy efficient bulbs that are just as bright, just as good and will actually save you money over the long run. >> traditional 60 and 40 watt bulbs will go away in 2014. you can buy compact bulbs or l.e.d. bulbs. >> just hours before lawmakers are out of time on averting the so-called fiscal cliff. let's check in with hampton pearson who has more on that and the rest of the business. >> we have the markets in a narrow trading range keyed in on fiscal cliff talks. hours now for lawmakers to avoid going over the fiscal cliff. the dow is up barely less than two points at 12939. the nasdaq up 18 points. the s & p is up four. congress may be able to skirt the dairy cliff. the house and agriculture committees are set to extend the farm bill to keep milk prices from surging. it would keep a long dormant milk subsidy coming back to life pushing milk over $6 more than twice the national average.
grassroots energy that got them out. i think college students were a big part of the win for prop 30. the fact that the current year's budget was built assuming that 30 was going to pass and that if it didn't, there were going to be trigger cuts that were going to cut into the higher education budget, really motivated a lot of students out. so, brown moves forward with that momentum. >> i really feel like that's kind of the nub of it. there was a huge component of fear involved, and well-based fear involved in the prop 30 campaign. it seemed like it finally got through to people that a tremendous percentage of the state budget is dedicated to k-12 and higher education and you can only cut so far, and we had come to that point without impacting those sections of the budget. >> what i think is so fascinating, tyche, about the passage of that, is people were scared, people voted, they decided it was worth -- even though they didn't trust the legislature, it was worth giving them more money. but we've been talking in the media for the last ten years about how california is broke, there's
, to our energy community who rely on energy tax breaks to keep on moving and keep on producing. so i don't want to see economic growth derailed. it was too horribly painful to sit through this very difficult economic recovery inch by inch, every day hoping we would push forward despite the odds. we have the -- we had the economic crisis in europe that weighed on us as well. well, what we did this morning was important. so i want to close by saying this to my friends in the house, all of them, democrats, republicans, liberals, moderates and conservativesmen conservati. this is not a perfect deal. we all know it. you know, each of us can find a piece of it that we really, really don't like. but on the whole, it will give certainty to this economy. in many cases, many of the provisions are permanent, like the a.m.t. it gives certainty and certainty is critical. we will not go back. we will not take billions and billions of dollars out of this economy. we can't do that now. and i would say to my conservative friends over there, now it's the 1st of the year, you're actually cutting taxes now.
, among other things, ancient and modern lives in her adopted home.th >> there's weirdly a lot of energy in athens, and, whether it's good or bad, there's a feeling. >> brown: what kind of energy? >> maybe there's a "there's nothing left to lose" as a kind of freedom as well. people are going out to plays. they're still going out and doing things, but, you know with less money. but there's an urgency. poetry meetings are very well attended.li literary events are packed. >> brown: why do you think that is? >> well, it's inexpensive, inexpensive entertainment. ( laughs ) but i think people want to be together. they want to be talking to people.ton >> brown: the crisis around here, she says, rarely makes it into her poetry in an explicit way. but she did have one direct hit for us, a playful work-in- progress called "austerity measures." >> i love the term "austerity measures." it sounds so poetic. >> brown: even though it's so" real, nitty-gritty in what's happening here? >> yes, i love the idea of "measures" as, you know, verse. it was prompted by a headline that i read somewhere, which w
for the research they do, investors make an clean energy jobs that they create. 2 million americans out of work, but out there looking, pounding payment every day for continue to receive unemployment benefits as long as they are actively looking for a job. but i think we all recognize this law is just one step in the broader effort to strengthen our economy and broaden the opportunity for everybody. the fact is the deficit is still too high and we're still investing too little into things that we need for the economy to grow as fast as it should. and that's why speaker boehner and i provisionally try to negotiate a larger agreement that would put this country on a path to paying down its debt, while also putting americans back to work, rebuilding roads and bridges and providing investments in areas like education and job training. unfortunately, there just wasn't enough support or time for that kind of large agreement in a lame-duck session of congress. and that failure comes at a cost us the messy nature of the process over the past several weeks has made is this more certain and consumers is
is tough, so i drink emergen-c. with vitamin c for immune support and b vitamins for natural energy, i'm ready for whatever they get into. get your free sample at myemergenc.com. stay healthy and feel the good. a little more. there's a real, like, camaraderie in the parking lot... shut up! that's it! let's go in the car. my time to shine is the smoked pulled pork. i think it's done broseph! pretty much got it down to a science... pretty much. we also really like a great pulled pork sandwich even when we can't make the game. you ruined it! some people even like it better. really? yep. [ male announcer ] new carving board pulled pork, get that delicious slow smoked taste without the hassle. it's game time food. it's oscar mayer. >>> still to come on this new year's day, a duet from colbie caillat and gavin degraw. >> and out on the rink. >> after your local news and weather. strength and determination are human too. so are dinner dates and birthday cake. introducing the new weight watchers 360 program. built for human nature so you can expect amazing. ♪ on top of the world right now
immigration system, protecting our planet from the harmful effects of climate change, boosting domestic energy production, protecting our kids from the horrors of gun violence. it's not just possible to do these things, it's an obligation to ourselves and to future generations. >> protecting our kids from gun violence. an absolutely critical issue in the light of what happened last month. joining us now is julian epstein a democratic strategist and dana milbank a columnist for "the washington post." the president says addressing gun violence will be a priority. but given what you and i have just witnessed in the congress and a new debt ceiling fight to come in about two months, can we really be optimistic about anything being done to address the issue of gun violence in this country? >> martin, i was up on capitol hill today to watch them wind things down. forget about the fiscal cliff which you point out all they did was punt it for 60 days. >> exactly. >> they can't even agree on -- in the house on enacting the hurricane sandy relief bill which everybody agrees needs to be done. so for us to
throughout today and tonight. let's break it down. you see the low sliding off the coast. getting energy if the west. it becomes intense and stays to the south of new england. now with that flow, we're getting the winds coming from the north, picking up the moisture from the atlantic. that's why eastern massachusetts, if you can see the brighter white here, indicates a little bit more intense snowfall. it is still something we're monitoring because the as the low slides east or west, that would impacts how much rain versus how much snow you get in new england. whether you're in new england or not, you'll face some travel troubles today. we have airport delays forecast for the northeast, the mid-atlantic, the midwest. and even down here in the south, we had delays in charlotte this morning. and on the west coast, we could see delays, low clouds and rain even in los angeles. busy travel weekend. lots of weather coast to coast that will impact millions of people. >> no escaping it, huh? >> no. >> thanks. >>> tax hikes, spending cuts, and the u.s. economy caught right in the middle. we can o
're away from home. adjust your thermostat remotely to help save energy and money. turn on the lights, even see that everyone is safe and secure. and with adt, you can rely on our fast response monitoring for 24/7 protection against burglary, fire, and high levels of carbon monoxide. the adt new year's sale. it could help you save something more important than money. call now to save $300 on adt starting at $99 installed plus 15% off accessories. sale ends midnight january 2nd. >>> top stories now. new york city police are searching for a woman this morning after a man was pushed to his death on a subway platform. witnesses say a woman was pacing that platform and mumble to herself. this is the second time in a month someone has been shoved in front of a train. >>> los angeles police probably did not expect to see this at a gun buyback program. "the l.a. times" reports that at least one rocket launcher was among the thousands of firearms turned in. no word whether the launcher was real, but the buyback program broke records. >>> and in money, banks setting records this year but not in a goo
commerce secretary, your energy secretary. so he relied on sort of the people just around him. i think this administration and the president should do a better job of getting his cabinet out there, because, frankly, most americans don't even know who the rest of the cabinet members are. >> finer point on it, roland. do you think the president is sending a message that he won't fight for his nominees? >> well, i think what he's doing is, he's picking and choosing his battles, but he needs to understand, the last four years, republicans fought him on everything. he should send the signal, i'm not going to play the games we played the last four years. i'm going to be very aggressive, and if you want to deny me my choice, then you should vote that person down. he should have put her forward, and look, if he wants former senator chuck hagel, put him forward as well, and tell the senate, i dare you to do it. >> alice, that brings up an interesting point. tom friedman wrote an op-ed in "the new york times" today, defending chuck hagel. i want to read a portion of it. he says, "hagel is out of
melissa hart said, and very importantly acknowledge the leadership in terms of the energy she brought to the white center, this lecture was her brainchild. the constitution of the activities were brainchild, and recognizing that under the board of regents, the chase award given from the president's office given to melissa hard for her work in community service. so i want to acknowledge mullah so hard. [applause] -- melissa hart. >> and finally, all of you make such a difference to us. when i think about what makes a successful of the law school, having a diverse, inclusive and collaborative community about standing -- outstanding students, faculty, alumni, and friends, gives us -- the members here come and there are several, very supportive a lawns, professors, this community can come together and really make a difference. and you all matter in so many ways, so want to thank all of you. i can't name you all, but you really help make us successful. now, when justice ginsburg agreed to, she said don't want to give a lecture, but i would like a fireside chat. and i said that would be lov
to the bathrooms which is a good thing. but it can be very cold, and it is a lot of fun. such great energy. people come from all over the world. >> meantime, i'm carl quintanilla along with erica hill. lester has the morning off. >>> coming up this morning, we'll look at 25 years of "weekend today." >> we celebrated that silver anniversary this year. we'll share the big stories from that quarter century and hear from some of the people you've shared your weekends with over that time. >>> plus, ever wonder what happens to those christmas presents that you take back to the store? most aren't just put back on the shelf. we're going to show you one place where holiday returns are big business. >>> plus, a little later, love and romance on ice. we're going to take you to the iconic new york location just outside our studios where many men pop the question. that may look familiar to you. >> kind of gives it away. >> a little bit. >>> and we'll begin this half-hour, though, with a love story 25 years in the making. it all started when a sixth grade boy wrote a letter to a classmate who was then the apple
consequence. she's apparently to be head of a energy company that wants favors from epa or princeton. it's more important. we got legal proceedings to stop this massive economic dislocation. hopefully these candid discussions in the name of a false identity will shed light on that case. >> kelly: chris, we thank you for joining us and discussing this case that you're now pursuing. >> thank you. >> eric: coming up, the two things you'll need to know for new year's. great easy cocktails and a hangover cure you can find in the fridge. >> kelly: let's check in with gregg jarrett for what's coming up at the top of the hour. >> it's not my fridge. president obama set to meet today with house and senate leadership to make one more attempt to avoid going over the cliff. one prominent senator says hey, this meeting feels more like optics than anything real. are we skeptical? we'll have a fair and balanced debate. are dozens of law schools guilty of legal ethics violations? not mine. legal panel is here to weigh in on that in "america's newsroom" [ malennouncer ] it's tt time of year again. time f
was an engineer with a passion to try a lot of new stuff and i have a lot of energy. i hired people because i could not do myself what i wanted to do, and so i had employees. and i respected the work that they did because i gave them good salaries and the very best dental and health insurance, better than lockheed. and i never thought that i was there to grow a business or to make a profit. in fact, the number one thing -- and i always said that even to those who held stock in my company -- the number one thing, the biggest priority for my employees was to have fun. i enjoyed the accomplishment of breakthroughs and the fun of a first applied. and everyone who worked for me deserved to have that enjoyment. the second priority was the families of the employees have fun. that is why we provided good salaries and good health care and so on. the third priority, no cutting to make a profit. it is tough to say that to a stockholder or a board member. but every company i have ever seen go bankrupt, they started having fun -- they stop having fun before that. when people have fun, they will work like.
Search Results 0 to 36 of about 37 (some duplicates have been removed)